Neighborhood Score Mobile App

Neighborhood Score Mobile App

Neighborhood Score is a mobile application designed to provide an overall health and sustainability score, block-by-block for every neighborhood in the city of San Francisco. The application is based on a holistic model, which identifies assets and hazards in the physical and social environments of any given urban area. The app can be used to assess livability, identify success and failures in various communities, and most importantly, advocate for a healthier city on a street-by-street basis – empowering residents and elected officials.

Neighborhood Score uses local, state, federal, and private data sets to allow residents to see how their neighborhoods rank in everything from public safety, to quality of schools, crime rates, air quality, and much more. The new app makes information about neighborhood health easily accessible to residents and demonstrates the power of open government data to advance community health through government transparency. Appallicious worked closely with both the San Francisco Mayor’s office, and SFDPH Environmental Health to create Neighborhood Score.

The new app makes information about their neighborhood health easily accessible to residents and demonstrates the power of open government data to advance community health through government transparency. Neighborhood Score also has the potential to inform consumer and real estate market decisions while also advocating for healthier communities and environmental justice.

Neighborhood Score can easily be replicated and licensed anywhere in the country, provided that cities have made their data accessible to the public and companies like Appallicious. The application is fully customizable for any city in the United States, and takes weeks, not months to create.

What Makes a Healthy Neighborhood?

Neighborhood Score Indicators

Neighborhood Score Indicators
Description Element Source Health Outcomes
Average annual violent crimes per 1,000 people (homicides not included) Community Local Police Department Mental health, safety, physical well-being
Average annual property crimes per 1,000 people Community Local Police Department Mental health, safety, physical well-being, physical activity
Number of alcohol outlets for 1,250 people Community State Department of Alcohol Beverage Control Violence, obesity, diabetes, alcoholism
Percent of registered voters who voted in the 2010 election Community Local Department of Elections Premature mortality, self-rated health, physical well being
Jobs per acre Economy Local Employment Dynamics Partnership of U.S. Census Bureau Premature mortality, cardiovascular disease, mental health, meeting based material needs
Percent of population with health insurance coverage Economy American Community Survey, U.S Census Bureau Premature death
Percent of population within half a mile of a bank or credit union Economy Dun & Bradstreet Physical activity, financial stability, neighborhood cohesion & safety
Available child care slots per 1,000 youth Education State Department of Social Services, Children’s Council , U.S. Census Bureau physical and cognitive development, behavioral outcomes
Elementary school access Education CA Department of Education, U.S. Census Physical activity, chronic disease, mental health
Fine particulate matter concentration Environment Regional  Air Quality Management District Cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, chronic respiratory illness
Description Element Source Health Outcomes
Trees per acre Environment Science Application International Corporation and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, 2007 Skin cancer, water quality, chronic respiratory issues, pedestrian injuries, mental health
Total cancer risk is cases per million from diesel particulate matter and total organic gases Environment Regional Air Quality Management District cancer
Average outdoor noise levels Environment Federal Highway Administration’s Traffic Noise Model Mental health, hearing loss, cardiovascular disease, quality of sleep
Percent of renter population that spends 50% or more of their gross income on rent Housing American Community Survey, U.S Census Bureau Infectious disease, substandard housing conditions, food insecurity
Number of no-fault evictions per 1,000 renters Housing City Rent Board Mental health, stress, depression, housing insecurity
Annual number of safe housing and building violations per 1,000 people Housing Department of Public Health and Department of Building Inspections chronic respiratory illness, allergies, asthma, safety, lead poisoning
Public art pieces per 1,000 people Public Realm  Arts Commission Mental health, physical activity
Recreation area access Public Realm City Planning Department, U.S. Census Bureau Mental health, physical activity
Food access Public Realm Dun & Bradstreet, Department of Public Health Chronic disease like obesity and diabetes, malnutrition
Proportion of commute trips made by non-auto modes of transportation Transportation County Transportation Authority physical activity, mental health, respiratory health
Description Element Source Health Outcomes
Public transit access Transportation Google Transit Data Feed physical activity, motor-vehicle injuries, respiratory illness
Number of pedestrian injuries per square mile (2005-2010) Transportation Highway Patrol, Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System Injuries, mortality, physical activity
Traffic density Transportation County Transportation Authority Respiratory illness, asthma, noise, mental health, safety

Support Enquiries

Support:

351 California Street, Suite 400

San Francisco, CA 94104

Email: support@appallicious.com

Phone: 415-797-7404

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 24, 2013

Contact: Brian Purchia, 202-253-4330, brian@appallicious.com

 

*** PRESS RELEASE ***

      

SAN FRANCISCO MAYOR EDWIN LEE UNVEILS “NEIGHBORHOOD SCORE” IPHONE APP, HOUSING DATA FEED AT US CONFERENCE OF MAYORS ANNUAL MEETING IN LAS VEGAS

 

Mobile app from San Francisco start-up, Appallicious uses government data to visualize and improve community health through government transparency; Provides San Francisco residents, local government leaders with neighborhood ranking scores, access to massive amounts of data, right from their smartphone

 

Las Vegas, NV – Yesterday, San Francisco Mayor Edwin Lee unveiled a new mobile application from Appallicious, the San Francisco based start-up behind San Francisco’s Rec & Park app, featured by the US Department of Energy, and named one of the 7 open data apps every city should have by Mashable. Appallicious’ new Neighborhood Score app uses open data to create a first-of-its-kind rating system for every neighborhood in the City of San Francisco. Appallicious worked closely with both the Mayor’s office, and the San Francisco Department of Public Health to create Neighborhood Score. The new app makes information about neighborhood health easily accessible to residents and demonstrates the power of open government data to advance community health through government transparency. Neighborhood Score has the potential to inform consumer and real estate market decisions while also advocating for healthier communities and environmental justice.

“Open data policies are a win-win for everyone involved, leading to more efficient government, greater transparency, and better communication between residents and City leaders,” said San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee. “I encourage other mayors to learn more about how to make their cities more innovative and benefit from open data policies and partnerships with innovative companies like Appallicious.”

Mayor Lee launched the app at the 81st annual US Conference of Mayors, during his Technology and Innovation Task Force panel, which included Appallicious Co-Founder Yo Yoshida, and other mayors from throughout the country.

“Neighborhood Score is another example of the power of partnerships between government innovators and private entrepreneurs. With this new app, San Francisco residents will be able to see how their neighborhood stacks up against others and help elected officials better evaluate policies and programs block by bock,” said California Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom. “Open data policies are a win-win for everyone involved. It leads to more efficient government, greater transparency, and better communication between residents and city leaders.”

Along with Neighborhood Score, Mayor Lee and Code For America also announced a new housing open data feed, the Home Facts Data Standard that provides housing information for residents in San Francisco. Neighborhood Score is the first app to be built off this feed – it is expected many more apps will be created from this feed similar to apps being created from the Open311 API (the first API in government).

“San Francisco is a leader in the open data movement, and the success of civic start-ups like Appallicious is a testament to the leadership of Mayor Lee, the SFDPH Environmental Health and the City of San Francisco’s forward thinking open data policies,” said Yo Yoshida, co-founder of Appallicious. “Neighborhood Score makes it easy to see which neighborhoods are thriving, and how elected officials can better serve target areas that need improvement or more resources. The application will also help increase accountability by allowing residents and local leaders to see how programs are performing and resources are being utilized in their neighborhood.”

Neighborhood Score utilizes 20 open data sets, collected from federal, state, and local agencies, as well as private data feeds (For a full list of feeds click here). The application then compiles the data into a 100-point rating score, displayed as a heat map on your iPhone. Through the app, residents are able to see how their neighborhoods rank, down to the city block, regarding public safety, quality of schools, crime rates, air quality, walkability, access to public transportation, and much more. This transformative application provides residents with access to massive amounts of data about their neighborhood in an easy-to-use format, right at their fingertips.

“We have seen the enormous potential for what’s possible in the dynamic public-private partnerships between Appallicious and the City of San Francisco,” said sf.citi Chairman Ron Conway. “When local governments open up their data, entrepreneurs and innovative companies are able to synthesize it into a platform that any citizen with a mobile device can access. San Francisco is once again moving the open data movement forward with its housing feed and the Neighborhood Score app.”

 

Mayor Lee has been a staunch supporter for open data policies since his days as City Administrator, when he helped start the city’s Gov 2.0 efforts by managing the city’s one-stop data clearinghouse, DataSF.org. Last year, Yoshida joined with the Mayor, Supervisor David Chiu and San Francisco Rec & Park GM Phil Ginsburg to introduce the city’s revised open data legislation and launch the San Francisco Rec & Park app. And earlier this year, Yoshida spoke before the Government Audit and Oversight Committee advocating for the passage of San Francisco’s open data law. Among other reforms, the legislation allows San Francisco to appoint a new Chief Data Officer (CDO) as well as department-level Data Coordinators throughout the city.

Neighborhood Score can easily be replicated and licensed anywhere in the country, provided that cities have made their data accessible to the public and companies like Appallicious. The application is fully customizable for any city in the United States, and takes weeks, not months to create.

The Neighborhood Score app will be available to download for free in Apple’s app store and is featured in the City’s DataSF App Showcase. The app will soon be available for different phone operating systems including Android™, and web mobile.

 

View the Neighborhood Score app here:
http://www.appallicious.com/neighborhood-score/

View the Neighborhood Score app and other civic apps in DataSF App Showcase: http://www.datasf.org/showcase/

View the Home Facts Data Standard here:
www.housefacts.me

View the City of San Francisco’s Open Data Legislation:
http://innovation.sfgov.org/open-data-legislation/

 

About Appallicious: Appallicious (http://www.appallicious.com) has created a first-of-its-kind mobile commerce platform, which allows government and business to create and manage their own custom mobile apps and generate new revenue through ticketing, reservations, merchandising, permitting and more via mobile devices and web widgets. The Skipitt™ Platform enables government and business to generate revenue by leveraging your existing customer base and extending it via mobile. Appallicious is based in San Francisco, CA and is a Silicon Valley Innovation Summit A0250 to Watch Winner.